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9783954901364

Lehnert, Isolde

Zur Kur an den Nil

Die Ägyptenreise von Max und Otto Meyerhof im Winter 1900/01

2017
21.0 x 27.0 cm, 280 p., 116 illustrations b/w, 147 illustrations color, hardback
69,00 €

ISBN: 9783954901364
Preface
Table of Contents
Sample

Short Description

„Zur Kur an den Nil“ is the commented edition of a travelogue from winter 1900/01 written by the German-Jewish Ophthalmologist and Orientalist Max Meyerhof (1874-1945). It was because of health reasons that Meyerhof, together with his younger relative Otto Meyerhof (1884-1951), the later Nobel laureate in medicine, spent five months in Egypt. His travelogue gives a vivid and entertaining account of the manifold impressions during their sojourn on the banks of the Nile. Texts and illustrations from contemporary travel literature were added to widen the view and complete the richly illustrated volume. Further research concerns some places they visited, certain experiences of the two travelers, as well as encounters with well-known or unknown people. Deliberately written in a popular-scientific style the book aims to enliven documents from former times with “infotainment”, in order to reveal how events and people are linked together – back then and now.

Description

„Zur Kur an den Nil“ is the commented edition of a travelogue from winter 1900/01 kept in the Archive of the German Archaeological Institute Cairo. It is written by the German-Jewish Ophthalmologist and Orientalist Max Meyerhof (1874-1945) who set off to Egypt, in the company of his younger relative Otto Meyerhof (1884-1951), the later Nobel laureate in medicine. It was because of health reasons that both spent five months on the banks of the Nile. Having stayed six weeks in Helwan, in those days a worldwide renowned spa near Cairo, they proceeded further south to Luxor and Aswan. Besides their medical applications they took the time to immerse deeply into the strange, exotic environment of the Orient. Meyerhof gives a vivid and entertaining account of the things they saw and experienced, albeit in the Eurocentric characteristic style of the era, resulting in an ambivalent mixture of fascination and depreciating distance. Compared to quotations from contemporary travel literature, which are ranging in tone from arrogant and dismissive to obvious racist expressions, Meyerhof’s remarks are rather moderate. As a trained Ophthalmologist he for sure is aware of the correlation between the omnipresent filth and the widely spread eye diseases which stamped Egypt for centuries as “Land of the Blind”. It is during this journey that he makes his first contacts with Egyptian doctors; later on he is going to dedicate his life to bring relief and cure for those who suffer from this plague. His travelling acquaintances include prominent people such as Karl Neufeld (1856-1918), who became famous as the prisoner of the Mahdi, or Mohareb Todrous (ca. 1847-1937), German consular agent and antiquity dealer in Luxor. Due to his cousin Wilhelm Spiegelberg (1870-1930) Meyerhof has not only a basic idea about archaeology in Egypt but also knows the great connoisseur of Africa, Georg Schweinfurth (1836-1925), who designed a geological map of the desert around Helwan. They are discussed and highlighted in separate research chapters, as well as longtime residents of Cairo such as the khedivial photographer Paul Dittrich (1868-after 1934) and the German innkeeper August Gorff (1835-ca. 1902). Another chapter reveals the striking history of two travel agencies by the Berlin Stangen-family, which became Thomas Cook’s hardest competitors in opening Egypt for individual and mass tourism. Deliberately written in a popular-scientific style the richly illustrated book aims to enliven documents from former times with “infotainment”, in order to reveal how events and people are linked together – back then and now. Comprehensive references to literature and unpublished archival resources and two indices facilitate further research.

Biographical Note

Isolde Lehnert, M.A., born in 1958, has studied Egyptology, Near Eastern Archaeology and Ethnology in Heidelberg besides her work as a graduate librarian. Since 2003 she is the head of the Library and Archive of the German Archaeological Institute Cairo. She published several articles concerning both fields, such as the history of the library formerly in possession of the Egyptologist Ludwig Keimer (1892-1957), and his excellent collection of travel literature about Egypt and the Near East.

Series Description

“Menschen - Reisen - Forschungen. Wissenschaftsgeschichte aus Ägypten” is a new series published by the German Archaeological Institute in Cairo. It comprises biographical works about individual researchers and travellers in Egypt, especially in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The extensive material from the archives of the Institute in Cairo is thereby made available to a growing readership with an interest in the scientific history of oriental countries. Each volume in this series is scientifically sound, extensively illustrated and written in an accessible style.

Keywords

20th century, c 1900 to c 1999 (68) || Alltagskultur (12) || Archaeology (338) || Archaeology by period / region (259) || Classic travel writing (12) || Egypt (232) || History (706) || History: specific events & topics (260) || Luxor (2) || Max Meyerhof || North Africa (237) || Otto Meyerhof || Reisebericht (7) || Social & cultural history (22) || Travel & holiday (27) || Travel writing (12) || Ägypter (3) || Ägyptisch (3)