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9783895009648

Gertzen, Thomas L.

Boote, Burgen, Bischarin

Heinrich Schäfers Tagebuch einer Nubienreise zum zweiten Nilkatarakt im Jahre 1900

2014
21.0 x 27.0 cm, 280 p., 250 illustrations color, hardback
79,00 €

ISBN: 9783895009648
Preface
Table of Contents
Sample

Short Description

In 1900 five German scholars travelled to the region of the second cataract to study pharaonic fortifications and pursue ethnographic research in Nubia. Surplus funds from the Ernst-von-Sieglin-Expedition to Siwa Oasis were utilized to finance the expedition. Taking part were Ludwig Borchardt (1863–1938), later director of the Imperial German Institute for Egyptian Archaeology; the imperial German diplomat Curt von Gruenau (1871–1939); Heinrich Schäfer (1868–1957), later director of Berlin’s Egyptian Museum; Leipzig professor of Egyptology, Georg Steindorff (1861–1951); and the classical archaeologist Hermann Thiersch (1874–1939).
The expedition departed Assuan on March 3rd and went upstream as far as the second cataract and the fortress of Semna, visiting, among other sites, Philae, Kalabsha, Dendur, Dakke, Maharraqa, Amada, Aniba, Abu Simbel, Wadi Halfa and Mirgissa. The tour ended back at Assuan on April 19th .
Travelling by boat, the party had ample opportunity to study and record ancient temples, settlements, fortresses, and inscriptions, taking due note of their state of preservation. The scholars also verified and supplemented the results of the famous Prussian Expedition (1842–1845) of Carl Richard Lepsius (1810–1884); subsequently, their records were used for several publications.
During the journey two members of the party, Georg Steindorff and Heinrich Schäfer, kept diaries, recording memorable events and scientific results. Borchardt’s typed copy of Steindorff’s diary is preserved at the Swiss Institute in Cairo, whereas Schäfer’s journal was long believed lost.
Recent research through archival material at the German Archaeological Institute’s Cairo branch and at the headquarters in Berlin turned up Schäfer’s journal virtually intact.
To enable scholars to utilize this important source not only for the history of Egyptology but also as a travel log for a region nowadays totally submerged beneath the waters of Lake Nasser, Schäfer’s journal has been annotated and cross-references provided to Steindorff’s account. The text is supplemented with contemporaneous illustrations – photographs, water-colours, and postcards – to create an integrated source­book.

Description

In 1900 five German scholars travelled to the region of the second cataract to study pharaonic fortifications and pursue ethnographic research in Nubia. Surplus funds from the Ernst-von-Sieglin-Expedition to Siwa Oasis were utilized to finance the expedition. Taking part were Ludwig Borchardt (1863–1938), later director of the Imperial German Institute for Egyptian Archaeology; the imperial German diplomat Curt von Gruenau (1871–1939); Heinrich Schäfer (1868–1957), later director of Berlin’s Egyptian Museum; Leipzig professor of Egyptology, Georg Steindorff (1861–1951); and the classical archaeologist Hermann Thiersch (1874–1939).
The expedition departed Assuan on March 3rd and went upstream as far as the second cataract and the fortress of Semna, visiting, among other sites, Philae, Kalabsha, Dendur, Dakke, Maharraqa, Amada, Aniba, Abu Simbel, Wadi Halfa and Mirgissa. The tour ended back at Assuan on April 19th .
Travelling by boat, the party had ample opportunity to study and record ancient temples, settlements, fortresses, and inscriptions, taking due note of their state of preservation. The scholars also verified and supplemented the results of the famous Prussian Expedition (1842–1845) of Carl Richard Lepsius (1810–1884); subsequently, their records were used for several publications.
During the journey two members of the party, Georg Steindorff and Heinrich Schäfer, kept diaries, recording memorable events and scientific results. Borchardt’s typed copy of Steindorff’s diary is preserved at the Swiss Institute in Cairo, whereas Schäfer’s journal was long believed lost.
Recent research through archival material at the German Archaeological Institute’s Cairo branch and at the headquarters in Berlin turned up Schäfer’s journal virtually intact.
To enable scholars to utilize this important source not only for the history of Egyptology but also as a travel log for a region nowadays totally submerged beneath the waters of Lake Nasser, Schäfer’s journal has been annotated and cross-references provided to Steindorff’s account. The text is supplemented with contemporaneous illustrations – photographs, water-colours, and postcards – to create an integrated source­book.

Biographical Note

Dr. phil. Thomas L. Gertzen

Dr. Thomas L. Gertzen studierte Ägyptologie, klassische Archäologie und Assyriologie an den Universitäten
Münster, Berlin (FU) und Oxford und schloss sein Studium 2007 mit einer Magisterarbeit über
„Methodik und wissenschaftsgeschichtlicher Hintergrund der Arbeiten von Sir W. M. Flinders Petrie“ ab. 2010 wurde er am Lehrstuhl für Wissenschaftsgeschichte der Humboldt Universität zu Berlin über: „École de Berlin und ‚Goldenes Zeitalter‘ (1882–1914) der Ägyptologie als Wissenschaft. Das Lehrer-Schüler-Verhältnis zwischen Ebers, Erman und Sethe“ (ersch. 2013) promoviert. Neben zahlreichen Forschungsreisen und Archivrecherchen befasste er sich u. a. mit der Digitalisierung der Altakten des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts, Abteilung Kairo und ist z. Zt. als Consultant Researcher an dem Projekt „Egyptology in the Nazi Era. National Socialism and the Profile of a Humanistic Discipline,
1933–1945“ der University of British Columbia sowie als wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter an dem durch die
DFG geförderten Forschungsprojekt „Wissenshintergründe und Forschungstransfer am Beispiel des Ägyptologen Georg Steindorff (1861–1951)“ beteiligt. Im März 2014 hat er die Arbeit an seinem DFG-geförderten Forschungsprojekt „Die Bedeutung von Judentum und Konfessionalität für die Geschichte der Ägyptologie im deutschsprachigen Raum im Übergang vom 19. zum 20. Jahrhundert“ am Moses Mendelssohn Zentrum in Potsdam aufgenommen.

Series Description

“Menschen - Reisen - Forschungen. Wissenschaftsgeschichte aus Ägypten” is a new series published by the German Archaeological Institute in Cairo. It comprises biographical works about individual researchers and travellers in Egypt, especially in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The extensive material from the archives of the Institute in Cairo is thereby made available to a growing readership with an interest in the scientific history of oriental countries. Each volume in this series is scientifically sound, extensively illustrated and written in an accessible style.

Keywords

Abu Simbel (2) || Aniba || Arabic (93) || Archaeology (379) || Archaeology by period / region (299) || Aswan (2) || Bischarin || Borchardt, Ludwig || Brugsch, Heinrich || Classic travel writing (12) || Coptic (10) || Curt, von Grünau || Deutsches Kaiserreich || Egypt (233) || Elephantine || Engländer (2) || Erman, Adolf || History (736) || History: specific events & topics (268) || Kalabscha || Katarakt || Meroitisch || Nile Valley and Delta (3) || North Africa (238) || Nubien (7) || Nubier || Nubisch || Reiseliteratur (3) || Schäfer, Heinrich || Semna || Sethe, Kurt || Social & cultural history (30) || Steindorff, Georg || Sudan (10) || Thiersch, Hermann || Travel & holiday (27) || Travel writing (12) || Wissenschaftsgeschichte (8) || Ägypter (3) || Ägyptisch (3) || Ägyptologie (27)