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9783954900169

Editors: Lutz, Eckart Conrad; Jerjen, Vera; Putzo, Christine

Diagramm und Text. Diagrammatische Strukturen und die Dynamisierung von Wissen und Erfahrung

Überstorfer Colloquium 2012

2014
17.0 x 24.0 cm, 592 p., 13 illustrations b/w, 143 illustrations color, cloth
98,00 €

ISBN: 9783954900169
Preface
Table of Contents
Sample

Short Description

Diagrams, of which Isidore’s cosmological rota is perhaps the best example, are marked by their potential for abstraction. This same potential means that they lend themselves to a distinctive way of referring to a world that is complex and, in its complexity, ultimately defies comprehension and description. Diagrams allow basic structures of its order to be isolated and thus made graphically perceptible, with the ‘natural’ (naïve) view of the world giving way to a new, self-aware one in the process. The diagram is a cue to appreciate analytically certain features of an order that has been abstractly discerned in the natural form of the world, to recognize those features ‘again’ in it, and thus to ‘see through’ the world in distinguishing particular aspects of the order behind it. The diagram at the same time makes it possible to grasp the fact that the ‘artificial’ (scholarly) accomplishment of abstracting serves its purpose only if the tension between abstraction and the fundamental unfathomability of the world as creation is accepted, and the intellectual motion between the two that leads to comprehension is embraced. The aim of the intended processes of comprehension here is a view (contuitus) that brings together those aspects that were initially singled out in the course of abstraction. The structures that appear in diagrams of this kind also give a glimpse of their maker’s nature , are media for knowing God.
The theme of the colloquium whose findings are presented here was directly grounded in literary history: the central interest lay in the literary (in a broad sense) mediation of scholarly knowledge in a courtly context. The aim, however, was also to extend this interest by including analogous material from other contexts, so as to cover both the description of other forms in which diagrammatic thought manifests itself and theoretical reflection on it. The scope of the contributions ranges from the diagrammatic legacy of Antiquity to various forms of a way of thinking – the definition of which is kept open here – that has an affinity with diagrams or is, quite simply, diagrammatic. The varieties of it that can be encountered more tangibly include, among others, meditation, fictional narration, historiographical writing, or play. The forms in which the diagrammatic manifests itself range from the physically visible rota of Isidore to abstract structures of text and image that exist only in thought. They all, from the most simple to the most complex, show great consistency in combining instances of conclusion, of stabilization, with instances of release, of catalysis; are always epistemically relevant; and offer recipients the chance to expand their knowledge, gain new insights, and reassess their own attitudes and actions.

Description

Diagrams, of which Isidore’s cosmological rota is perhaps the best example, are marked by their potential for abstraction. This same potential means that they lend themselves to a distinctive way of referring to a world that is complex and, in its complexity, ultimately defies comprehension and description. Diagrams allow basic structures of its order to be isolated and thus made graphically perceptible, with the ‘natural’ (naïve) view of the world giving way to a new, self-aware one in the process. The diagram is a cue to appreciate analytically certain features of an order that has been abstractly discerned in the natural form of the world, to recognize those features ‘again’ in it, and thus to ‘see through’ the world in distinguishing particular aspects of the order behind it. The diagram at the same time makes it possible to grasp the fact that the ‘artificial’ (scholarly) accomplishment of abstracting serves its purpose only if the tension between abstraction and the fundamental unfathomability of the world as creation is accepted, and the intellectual motion between the two that leads to comprehension is embraced. The aim of the intended processes of comprehension here is a view (contuitus) that brings together those aspects that were initially singled out in the course of abstraction. The structures that appear in diagrams of this kind also give a glimpse of their maker’s nature , are media for knowing God.
The theme of the colloquium whose findings are presented here was directly grounded in literary history: the central interest lay in the literary (in a broad sense) mediation of scholarly knowledge in a courtly context. The aim, however, was also to extend this interest by including analogous material from other contexts, so as to cover both the description of other forms in which diagrammatic thought manifests itself and theoretical reflection on it. The scope of the contributions ranges from the diagrammatic legacy of Antiquity to various forms of a way of thinking – the definition of which is kept open here – that has an affinity with diagrams or is, quite simply, diagrammatic. The varieties of it that can be encountered more tangibly include, among others, meditation, fictional narration, historiographical writing, or play. The forms in which the diagrammatic manifests itself range from the physically visible rota of Isidore to abstract structures of text and image that exist only in thought. They all, from the most simple to the most complex, show great consistency in combining instances of conclusion, of stabilization, with instances of release, of catalysis; are always epistemically relevant; and offer recipients the chance to expand their knowledge, gain new insights, and reassess their own attitudes and actions.

Biographical Note

Eckart Conrad Lutz (*1951), o. Prof. der Germanistischen Mediävistik an der Universität Freiburg Schweiz seit 1989; Publikationen zu Vorgängen des Schreibens, Lesens und Erkennens.

Vera Jerjen (*1984), Assistentin der Germanistischen Mediävistik an der Universität Freiburg Schweiz; Dissertation zu Thomasin von Zerclaere.

Christine Putzo (*1977), Maîtresse d’enseignement et de recherche für Germanistische Mediävistik an den Universitäten Lausanne und Neuchâtel seit 2013; Dissertation zu Konrad Fleck, ‚Flore und Blanscheflur‘; Habilitationsprojekt ‚Diagrammatisches Erzählen‘.

Keywords

,Fasciculus temporum‘ || Alfonso X., Castilla, Rey || Berthold von Nürnberg || Boccaccio || Cultural & media studies (221) || Cultural studies (203) || Diagramm (2) || Elhen von Wolfhagen, Tilemann || Epistemologie (2) || Ermengaud, Matfre || Fridolin, Stephan || Gudea || Guilelmus, de Conchis || Heinrich, von Neustadt || Herradis, Landsbergensis || Heymericus, de Campo || Hrabanus, Maurus || Hugo, de Sancto Victore (2) || Isidorus, Hispalensis || Lambertus, Audomarensis || Medialität || Mediävistik (7) || Philosophy (40) || Philosophy: epistemology & theory of knowledge (5) || Radulfus, Glaber || Society & culture: general (306) || Thomasin, Circlaere (2) || Topics in philosophy (13) || Wolgemut, Michael || ‚Oberrheinische Chronik‘ || ‚Psalter von St. Albans‘ || ‚Speculum virginum‘