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9783895009150

Editors: de Angelis, Francesco; Dickmann, Jens-Arne; Pirson, Felix; von den Hoff, Ralf

Kunst von unten? Stil und Gesellschaft in der antiken Welt von der »arte plebea« bis heute

Arte dal basso? Stile e società nel mondo antico, dall’ »arte plebea« ad oggi. Beiträge zu einem Kolloquium anlässlich des 70. Geburtstags von Paul Zanker, Rom, Villa Massimo, 8. bis 9. Juni 2007

2012
22.0 x 29.0 cm, 184 p., 158 illustrations b/w, paperback / softback
29,90 €

ISBN: 9783895009150
Table of Contents
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Short Description

Ranuccio Bianchi Bandinelli’s seminal article on the “Arte plebea” (1967) voiced the requirement that classical archaeology be pursued in a new way, as a critical discipline with an explicit historical orientation. In Germany this desideratum was substantiated and gained currency mainly thanks to the work of Paul Zanker. Since then the analysis of the relationship between form, content, and the social locus of ancient works of art defines broad sectors of classical archaeology. The ten papers collected here, which were delivered on the occasion of Zanker’s 70th birthday, illustrate several perspectives of this field of research; they devote particular attention to the imagery of Pompeii, but also to ancient Greek art as well as Roman provincial art. In this way they underscore the ongoing relevance of the issues related to the arte plebea and to similar formal phenomena, also across times. Using the questions formulated since 1967 and the 1970s as a starting point, these selected case studies manage to disclose further perspectives of research for classical archaeology understood as a form of socially oriented art history.

Description

In 1967 Ranuccio Bianchi Bandinelli introduced the first issue of the journal Dialoghi di Archeologia with a programmatic article entitled “Arte plebea”. With this term he designated forms of artistic representation that replaced ‘high-art’ conventions of figural representation such as spatial perspective or naturalistic proportions with the symbolic isolation of motifs in order to increase their immediacy and expressiveness--a phenomenon that was especially apparent in the cultures of ancient Italy. His study of the arte plebea, and the very conception of the Dialoghi di Archeologia, were informed by the requirement that classical archaeology be pursued in a new way, namely as a critical discipline with an explicit historical orientation. This requirement led to sustained controversies, but also had a wide impact and substantially changed the field. In the Germany of the 1970s this change occurred mainly thanks to the publications of Paul Zanker. Together with the notion of arte plebea, Zanker’s scholarship has significantly contributed to the understanding of a basic phenomenon of ancient art, as well as of art generally: the relationship between form, content, and the social locus of artworks. In June 2007, on the occasion of Zanker’s 70th birthday, a colloquium was held in Rome with the aim of determining the current standing of the study of this relationship, especially from the point of view of Zanker’s closest colleagues and friends. The ten papers from that conference that are presented here expound a variety of perspectives on the interpretation of ancient works of art in their social and political context, in terms of both form and content: while particular attention is devoted to the imagery of Pompeii, topics covered range from ancient Greek art to provincial Roman art, and include Greek votive reliefs, Roman state reliefs, funerary monuments, and portraits. In this way the ongoing relevance of the issues related to the arte plebea and similar formal phenomena can also be underscored diachronically. Using the questions formulated since 1967 and the 1970s as a starting point, these selected case studies manage to disclose further perspectives of research for classical archaeology understood as a form of socially oriented art history.

Biographical Note

Francesco de Angelis
(born 1968) is a classical archaeologist. He earned is Ph.D. from the Scuola Normale Superiore in 2003. Since 2005 he teaches at Columbia University in the City of New York, where he is Associate Professor. Previously, he worked at the German Archaeological Institute in Rome and at the Scuola Normale in Pisa. His research focuses especially on the function of Greek mythological images in Etruscan funerary art in the Hellenistic period, the role of monuments as carriers of cultural memory, with special reference to Pausanias, the interaction between space, images and viewers, as well as the reception of antiquity in modern scholarship and culture.

J.-A. Dickmann
(born 1960) studied Classical Archaeology, Ancient History and Byzantine Archaeology at the Univ. of Freiburg and Munich. After his PhD 1992 at the Univ. of Munich he became Lecturer at the Univ. of Cologne and Munich (1994-2001). Between 2001-2011 he was Lecturer / Senior Lecturer at the Univ. of Heidelberg and since 2011 has been Senior Lecturer at the Univ. of Freiburg. His favoured research topics focus on the archaeology of the Vesuvian cities (urbanism, economic and social history) and on ancient childhood.

Felix Pirson
(born 1968) studied Classical Archaeology, Ancient History and Art History at Bonn, Cologne, Munich and Cambridge. 1996 he finished a PhD about domestic architecture of the Vesuvian cities at Munich University. After appointments at the DAI Rome and Cottbus Technical University, he became Assistant Professor at the Institute of Classical Archaeology at Leipzig University in 2000, where he did his postdoctoral lecture qualification in 2005 with a thesis about images of battle and fight in ancient art. Since 2006 he is First Director of DAI Istanbul branch and head of the Pergamon Excavation. His main research topics are ancient urbanism, Pergamon, the archaeology of the Vesuvian cities and images of war and violence.

Ralf von den Hoff
(born 1963) received his PhD in Classical Archaology from the University of Bonn in 1992 with a book about “Philosophenporträts des Früh- und Hochhellenismus”. His second book on Theseus (“Der Heros und die Polis. Wandlungen des Theseusbildes im Athen des 6. und 5. Jhs. v. Chr.”) was finished at the University of Munich in 2001. He taught at Munich and at Johns-Hopkins University and held the position of an editor of the German Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum project in Munich. Since 2005 he is professor for Classical Archaeology at the Albert-Ludwigs-University in Freiburg im Breisgau. His focal research topics are ancient sculpture and portraiture, Greek and Roman visual culture and urbanism in ancient Asia Minor.

Series Description

With PALILIA, the German Archaeological Institute of Rome introduces a new series of publications, primarily monographs on archaeological research done in or starting from Italy. The series will deal with new approaches and innovative research methods, and subjects neglected in classical archaeology. The subject range includes central archaeological research areas, such as Graeco-Roman sculpture, iconography, architecture, urban research, and topographic studies, as well as topics from social and economic history, history of religion and of everyday life.

Keywords

Ancient Greece (28) || Ancient Rome (48) || Ancient World (120) || Aphrodisias (6) || Archaeological science, methodology & techniques (21) || Archaeological theory (3) || Archaeology (372) || Archaeology by period / region (292) || Augustus, Römisches Reich, Kaiser || Fine arts: treatments & subjects (376) || Grabdenkmäler (2) || Historical states, empires & regions (200) || History (730) || History of art (214) || History: specific events & topics (266) || Ikonographie (20) || Pompeji (6) || Römische Kunst (3) || Social & cultural history (28) || Wandmalerei (3) || c 1 CE to c 500 CE (147) || c 1000 BCE to start of CE period (123) || ‚arte plebea‘